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Section 191 Succession Act 1925: Property transferable by gift made in contemplation of death

Section 191 (Property transferable by gift made in contemplation of death) under Chapter XXIII (Of Gifts in Contemplation of Death) of Part VI (Testamentary Succession) of the Indian Succession Act, 1925

❝(1) A man may dispose, by gift made in contemplation of death, of any moveable property which he could dispose of by will.

(2) A gift is said to be made in contemplation of death where a man, who is ill and expects to die shortly of his illness, delivers, to another the possession: of any moveable property to keep as a gift in case the donor shall die of that illness.

(3) Such a gift may be resumed by the giver; and shall not take effect if he recovers from the illness during which it was made; nor if he survives the person to whom it was made.

Illustrations

 (i) A, being ill, and in expectation of death, delivers to B, to be retained by him in case of A’s death,— a watch; a bond granted by C to A; a bank-note; a promissory note of the Central Government endorsed in blank; a bill of exchange endorsed in blank; certain mortgage-deeds. A dies of the illness during which he delivered these articles. B is entitled to— the watch; the debt secured by C’s bond; the bank-note; the promissory note of the Central Government; the bill of exchange; the money secured by the mortgage-deeds.

 (ii) A, being ill, and in expectation of death, delivers to B the key of a trunk or the key of a warehouse in which goods of bulk belonging to A are deposited, with the intention of giving him the control over the contents of the trunk, or over the deposited goods, and desires him to keep them in case of A’s death. A dies of the illness during which he delivered these articles. B is entitled to the trunk and its contents or to A’s goods of bulk in the warehouse.

 (iii) A, being ill, and in expectation of death, puts aside certain articles in separate parcels and marks upon the parcels respectively the names of B and C. The parcels are not delivered during the life of A. A, dies of the illness during which he set aside the parcels. B and C are not entitled to the contents of the parcels.❞




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Notes:

The Indian Succession Act, 1925 was amended by from time to time by:
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1926 (37 of 1926);
- the Indian Succession (Second Amendment) Act, 1926 (40 of 1926);
- the Repealing and Amending Act, 1927 (10 of 1927);
- the Repealing Act, 1927 (12 of 1927);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1927 (18 of 1927);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1928 (14 of 1928);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1929 (18 of 1929);
- the Transfer of Property (Amendment) Supplementary Act, 1929 (21 of 1929);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1931 (17 of 1931);
- the Amending Act, 1934 (35 of 1934);
- the Government of India (Adaptation of Indian Laws) Order, 1937;
- the Repealing Act, 1938 (1 of 1938);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1939 (17 of 1939);
- the Berar Laws Act, 1941 (4 of 1941);
- the Indian Independence (Adaptation of Central Acts and Ordinances) Order, 1948;
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1949 (35 of 1949);
- the Adaptation of Laws Order, 1950;
- the Part B States (Laws) Act, 1951 (3 of 1951);
- the Repealing and Amending Act, 1952 (48 of 1952);
- the Repealing and Amending Act, 1953 (42 of 1953);
- the Union Territories (Laws) Amendment Act, 1956 (68 of 1956);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1957 (34 of 1957);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1962 (16 of 1962);
- the Repealing and Amending Act, 1964 (52 of 1964);
- the Delegated Legislation Provisions (Amendment) Act, 1983 (20 of 1983);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 1991 (51 of 1991);
- the Repealing and Amending Act, 2001 (30 of 2001);
- the Indian Succession (Amendment) Act, 2002 (26 of 2002).

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